The Paterson Great Falls National Hisorical Park

 

The Paterson Great Falls National Historical Park is the newest National Park.  Paterson, New Jersey was the first planned industrial city.  Alexander Hamilton looked over the Great Falls and the gears turned in his head.  Hamilton believed that American success depended on the ability to manufacture goods domestically.  He then began the Society for Establishing Useful Manufacturers (S.U.M.).  The city was named after governor and signer of the U.S. Constitution, William Paterson.  In the 18th century, there was virtually no manufacturing industry in the United States.  With the Passaic River as a power source the second industrial revolution began in this city.

This is where the  The great falls are a sight to be seen.  Overlook Park provides a nice view of the falls.

Paterson in Fall

While you are there be sure to check out the Paterson Museum, which details the industrial history of the Wright brothers plane engines, Samuel Colt, as well as the railroad industry.  All of which resided in Paterson.

 

The Alexander Hamilton Mixtape, an unofficial history

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Ford Mansion, George Washington’s crib from 1779-1780

New Jersey has a very special place in the history of the American Revolutionary War.  The Continental Army’s attack on Trenton onthe day after Christmas marked a turning point in the war.  It was the first victory for the Continental Army, without which the North American continent may very well still have British accents.  Some soldiers re-enlisted, but there were more recruits that came to the cause of fighting against the British.

Washington’s Headquarters

Source:  http://njmorriscountyonline.com/2001njmorrisfeaturearchive/assets/images/20010315_ford01.jpg

Ford Mansion is located in Morristown, New Jersey and is where George Washington stayed from 1779-1780.  Washington stayed here for two reasons.  It was defensible, and he was “able to keep his eye on the British army” in New York City.  While Washington stayed in the mansion, his soldiers stayed about 5 miles south in Jockey Hollow.  Both places belong to the National Park Service and are definitely worth a visit.

http://www.nps.gov/morr/index.htm